Aston Martin DB7

Aston Martin DB7 (1994-2004)

Aston Martin has always prided themselves on the DB series of fine automobiles. The iconic saviour of Aston Martin was David Brown, who bought Aston Martin in 1947. A few years later, plans were made to start producing the Le Mans prototype known as the DB2. Of course the rest is history, with the 1950s seeing the DB2/4 right up to the DB4 produced from 1958. The racing pedigree held fast with the sixties seeing the famous DB5, the DB6 and DBS until 1972.

Over twenty years later Aston Martin decided to resurrect the DB theme, producing the DB7 in far higher numbers than previous production runs to help financially secure the company for the future of car manufacturing, and the DB7 had to have a few tricks up its sleeve.

With Ford running the show now, Aston’s new generation DB model used the Jaguar XJS platform (also Ford-owned) but with Aston Martin styling added. The Jaguar AJ6 engine was also used in the entry level DB7 producing the kind of performance figures David Brown would have been proud of.

Buyers Guide

If you’re looking for a bargain GT car then the Aston Martin DB7 is for you. Values have decreased in the past 3 years although they are currently holding steady, making this model accessible at a lower price.

The first thing to look for when buying a DB7 is the car’s history. There should be no excuse; each DB7 should have well documented full service history. Check the body for signs of shoddy repair work as this could let in corrosion; also check the front of the car as stone chipping can also allow for rust getting in. Panels should be tight and even, but front impacts are common so make sure the sub-frame is all good as this can lead to uneven tyre wear.

Early DB7 models were rust proofed by Aston, but any model after 2002 would not be, so later models are more prone to rot. Servicing the DB7 can be done at most service centres every six months or 7,500 miles but a major service at 30,000 miles, you’d be better off at an Aston Martin or Jaguar specialist for piece of mind.

The DB7’s supercharger belt should be replaced every 30,000 miles; signs of this wearing out are a much depleted level of performance. Look out for cracks in the manifold as they are expensive to replace and there are two of them.

Interiors do live up to their reputation although it is quite a tight space inside. Look out for tears in the upholstery although this should be uncommon, and some of the switch gear is straight out of Fords parts bin.

Aston Martin DB7

Specification

Years Produced1994-2004
Performance0 - 60 mph 5.2 sec / Top Speed - 185 mph
Power & Torque 335 bhp / 360 Ib ft
Engine3239 cc straight six
super charged
Drive-train front engine / RWD
TransmissionFive speed manual/ four speed automatic
Weight1750 kg

Interesting Fact

Aston Martin still assemble their cars by hand and thus produce them in very low numbers by today’s standard. Every Aston Martin craftsman will mark a car with his personal brand after assembly is finished.

Mark Wilkinson, Managing Director Says:

”To own an Aston Martin puts you in a very exclusive club and the DB7 was the rebirth of the David Brown cars with luxury and elegance combined with speed and power, Britain at its best.”

mark says

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